3 scenes

3 Scenes That Affected My Life

In continuing the series of calling out a few scenes I’ve seen in my lifetime that truly stand out, here are 3 more. These are not simply scenes I remember — they truly had a profound impact on me and on how I view the art of filmmaking. 

This time I'm going to cover on how I fell in love with LOVE in the movies.

ROBIN HOOD: PRINCE OF THIEVES (dir. Kevin Reynolds) – Call me crazy but to me this is one of the most romantic moments put to screen. It's all starts with the magical and genius Michael Kamen score. Then I just love how cinematographer Douglas Milsome splashes that rimlight on Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio's hair. And the dialogue brings it home with such zingers as:.

Robin: It was good to see you again Marian.
Marian: It was good to be seen.

and

Robin: Your King Richard's cousin. You can get word to him of Nottingham's plan. He would believe you.
Marian: If the Sheriff found out I could lose all that I have.
Robin: It's true. But will you do it for your King?
Marian: No -- I'll do it for you.

Cue the fucking awesome Kamen score.

Swoon.

I don't think any actors could mess this scene up. And thankfully I'm a Costner fan anyway so all the talk about his accent that comes and goes doesn't bug me at all.


THE LAST OF THE MOHICANS (dir. Michael Mann) – There's something compelling about sacrifice and passion under extreme circumstances. Nothing like it to heighten the tension and romance right? Michael Mann is firing on all cylinders here with the backdrop of that breathtaking waterfall and the life and death stakes involved -- all brought home by the performances from Day-Lewis and Stowe. Seems like the parting of lovers -- the unrequited love -- the heartache -- is what I gravitate towards.

PS - Notice how Madeleine Stowe looks at him doing the "Stay alive!" speech....Jesus!


THE LAST AMERICAN VIRGIN (dir. Boaz Davidson) –  I was barely a teen but was totally into girls already, so I rented this film expecting to get my teen sex comedy T&A fix. And while it started it out like that, this ending crushed me. It was so real. Even at my young age I could relate because I was already going through puppy love and the rejection that comes along with it.  This film made me realize that movies -- when done well -- can still have deeper emotions in any type of film, regardless of genre.

When those end titles scroll...I thought "what the fuck? That's how they're gonna end this??" But yeah, it's real life.


3 Scenes That Affected My Life

In continuing the series of calling out a few scenes I’ve seen in my lifetime that truly stand out, here are 3 more. These are not simply scenes I remember — they truly had a profound impact on me and on how I view the art of filmmaking. 

This one is music and montage driven and how it can move a story forward.

TOOTSIE (dir. Sidney Pollack) – even as a kid I loved this moment. At first you may think it's just a superficial romantic montage, capturing those first innocent moments. But watch closely and you'll notice there's something deeper going on. Pollack structures it so brilliantly so that we're watching two people falling in love with OTHER PEOPLE.

WRITTEN ON THE WIND (dir. Douglas Sirk) – the first time I saw this film was in college. The juxtaposition of editing, the cross-cutting and use of music over images was pretty revolutionary to me. I hadn't really seen it used so effectively before and in such a violent manner. Mind blown.

PLANES TRAINS AND AUTOMOBILES (dir. John Hughes) – the images and flashbacks were used so effectively here that even as a teen I was so moved. I felt the power of a real friendship on display with perfectly timed cross cutting and the sublime score working together. In particular, it's when Steve Martin laughs to himself is what sticks with me to this day.

3 Scenes That Affected My Life

In continuing the series of calling out a few scenes I’ve seen in my lifetime that truly stand out, here are 3 more. These are not simply scenes I remember — they truly had a profound impact on me and on how I view the art of filmmaking.

Fair warning. We're gonna have minor spoilers here.

REAR WINDOW (dir. Alfred Hitchcock) – my parents showed me this and it's one of my top-ten all time faves. This moment made me lean forward and tell Grace Kelly to get out of there. Never had I felt such anxiety from seeing a film. I felt just as helpless as Jimmy Stewart. When Raymond Burr looks up at us across the way...jaw dropping. To be able to create such a visceral feeling, yup truly a master at work.

THE THING (dir. John Carpenter) – I saw this film at a friend's sleepover when I was in third grade (gotta love going to someone else's house to sneak in a horror film when you're 10). This film is full of great moments...but this sequence...oh man this sequence! The moment when his fucking chest caves in shocked the hell out of me. It blindsided me with a slap of fear and being disturbed all into one.  I can't recall feeling that way about a movie before seeing this film.

THE BREAKFAST CLUB (dir. John Hughes) – Seeing this clip brings back great nostalgia for me. I bought a used VHS from the video store across from my junior high (snuck off campus with my buddies to do it -- and talked the clerk into letting me purchase it, as this was before videotapes were sold cheaply to the public). When I saw the movie for the first time, it was just perfect. So relatable. So funny. So touching. And then this scene happened. So fucking romantic. It's stuck with me to this day on wondering how I'd ever be able to create something like this...not only a moment like this, but the actual feeling that fills my heart when I see it. It's all about a perfect budding romance. The what ifs. And all done with music and very little words.